DJ Grandmaster Flash

Hip-Hop Recording Artist, DJ, Producer, & Civil Rights Activist

“How you act, walk, look and talk is all part of Hip Hop culture. And the music is colorless. Hip Hop music is made from Black, brown, yellow, red and white.”

Grandmaster Flash is considered to be one of the pioneers of hip-hop DJing, cutting, and mixing. Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007, becoming the first hip hop act to be so honored.

DJ Grandmaster Flash and his group the Furious Five were hip-hop's greatest innovators, transcending the genre's party-music origins to explore the full scope of its lyrical and sonic horizons. Flash was born Joseph Saddler in Barbados on January 1, 1958; he began spinning records as teen growing up in the Bronx, performing live at area dances and block parties.

DJ Grandmaster Flash

By age 19, while attending technical school courses in electronics during the day, he was also spinning on the local disco circuit; over time, he developed a series of groundbreaking techniques including “cutting” (moving between tracks exactly on the beat), “back-spinning” (manually turning records to repeat brief snippets of sound), and “phasing” (manipulating turntable speeds) –– in short, creating the basic vocabulary which DJs continue to follow even today.

Flash did not begin collaborating with rappers until around 1977, first teaming with the legendary Kurtis Blow. He then began working with the Furious Five -- rappers Melle Mel (Melvin Glover), Cowboy (Keith Wiggins), Kid Creole (Nathaniel Glover), Mr. Ness aka Scorpio (Eddie Morris), and Rahiem (Guy Williams); the group quickly became legendary throughout New York City, attracting notice not only for Flash's unrivalled skills as a DJ but also for the Five's masterful rapping, most notable for their signature trading and blending of lyrics.

Despite their local popularity, they did not record until after the Sugarhill Gang's smash “Rapper's Delight” proved the existence of a market for hip-hop releases; after releasing “We Rap More Mellow” as the Younger Generation, Flash and the Five recorded “Superappin’” for the Enjoy label owned by R&B legend Bobby Robinson. They then switched to Sugar Hill Records, owned by Sylvia Robinson (no relation), after she promised them an opportunity to rap over a current DJ favorite, “Get Up and Dance” by Freedom (the idea had probably been originally conceived by Crash Crew for their single “High Powered Rap”).

DJ Grandmaster Flash

That record, 1980's “Freedom,” the group's Sugar Hill debut, reached the Top 20 on national R&B charts on its way to selling over 50,000 copies; its follow-up, “Birthday Party,” was also a hit. 1981's “The Adventures of Grandmaster Flash on the Wheels of Steel” was the group's first truly landmark recording, introducing Flash's “cutting” techniques to create a stunning sound collage from snippets of songs by Chic, Blondie, and Queen.

Flash and the Five's next effort, 1982's “The Message,” was even more revelatory –– for the first time, hip-hop became a vehicle not merely for bragging and boasting but for trenchant social commentary, with Melle Mel delivering a blistering rap detailing the grim realities of life in the ghetto. The record was a major critical hit, and it was an enormous step in solidifying rap as an important and enduring form of musical expression.

Following 1983's anti-cocaine polemic “White Lines,” relations between Flash and Melle Mel turned ugly, and the rapper soon left the group, forming a new unit also dubbed the Furious Five. After a series of Grandmaster Flash solo albums including 1985's They Said It Couldn't Be Done, 1986's The Source, and 1987's Da Bop Boom Bang, he reformed the original Furious Five lineup for a charity concert at Madison Square Garden; soon after, the reconstituted group recorded a new LP, 1988's On the Strength, which earned a lukewarm reception from fans and critics alike.

Another reunion followed in 1994, when Flash and the Five joined a rap package tour also including Kurtis Blow and Run-D.M.C. A year later, Flash and Melle Mel also appeared on Duran Duran's cover of “White Lines.” Except for a few compilations during the late '90s, Flash was relatively quiet until 2002, when a pair of mix albums appeared: The Official Adventures of Grandmaster Flash on Strut and Essential Mix: Classic Edition on FFRR Records.


Quick Facts

Birth Date:
January 1, 1958


  • Keith “Cowboy” Wiggins was one of the very first MC’s, and a member of seminal group Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. “Hip-hop” was a simple scat phrase he began chanting one day while mimicking the cadence of marching soldiers, mocking a friend who had just joined the Army. For some reason, the phrase worked its way into his stage performance and, during the Furious Five’s early appearances with disco bands, they were at times derisively referred to as “hip-hoppers.”
  • Joseph Saddler, the pioneering DJ known as Grandmaster Flash, didn’t just help invent the form ‐ he literally invented the piece of hardware that made the modern DJ mixer a reality. This was the cross fader ‐ the switch that toggles between the two turntables. 100% of today’s DJ mixers have one, allowing the DJ to monitor the record that isn’t currently playing in his headphones. Flash was an electronics student, and was pretty easily able to adapt a simple on/off switch to suit his purposes.
  • In 2002, performed during the closing ceremonies at the Commonwealth games in Manchester, England, which included Queen Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee celebration.
  • Released his memoir, The Adventures of Grandmaster Flash ‐ My Life My Beat, in 2008.
  • Uncle is Sandy Saddler, the featherweight boxing champion of the world in 1950.
  • DJ Grandmaster Flash
  • DJ Grandmaster Flash
  • DJ Grandmaster Flash

Similar Entries

Afrika Bambaataa Music

Afrika Bambaataa

Afrika Bambaataa is an American disc jockey, rapper, songwriter and producer from the South Bronx, New York. He is notable for releasing a series of genre-defining electro tracks in the 1980s that influenced the development of hip hop culture.

Read More
Big Daddy Kane Music

Big Daddy Kane

Antonio Hardy, better known by his stage name Big Daddy Kane, is a Grammy Award-winning American rapper and actor who started his career in 1986 as a member of the rap collective the Juice Crew. He is widely considered to be one of the most influential and skilled MCs in hip hop.

Read More
The Notorious B.I.G. Music

The Notorious B.I.G.

Christopher Wallace, known professionally as The Notorious B.I.G., Biggie Smalls, or Biggie, was an American rapper. Widely considered to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. He was noted for his “loose, easy flow”; dark, semi-autobiographical lyrics; and storytelling abilities.

Read More
Public Enemy Music

Public Enemy

Public Enemy is an American hip hop group known for their politically charged music and criticism of the American media, with an active interest in the frustrations and concerns of the African American community.

Read More
Rakim Music

Rakim

William Michael Griffin Jr., better known by his stage name Rakim, is an American rapper. One half of golden age hip hop duo Eric B. & Rakim, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential and most skilled MCs of all time.

Read More
Run-D.M.C. Music

Run-D.M.C.

Run-D.M.C. was an American hip hop group, founded in 1983 by Joseph Simmons, Darryl McDaniels, and Jason Mizell. Run-DMC is widely acknowledged as one of the most influential acts in the history of hip hop culture and one of the most famous hip hop acts of the 1980s.

Read More